2022-12-08

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General Assembly Adopts 11 Draft Resolutions, Promoting United Nations Cooperation with Several Regional, International Organizations | UN Press – United Nations

The General Assembly adopted 11 resolutions today promoting cooperation between the United Nations and a host of regional and international organizations and appointed a member to its Independent Audit Advisory Committee.
A draft on the United Nations cooperation with the Collective Security Treaty Organization ‑ which was adopted by a recorded vote ‑ drew both praise and criticism from Member States.  By its terms, the Assembly noted with appreciation the treaty organization’s significant practical contribution of to strengthen its peacekeeping capacities and the system of regional security and stability, to counter terrorism and transnational organized crime.  It invited both organizations to continue their interaction in the interest of the consistent and comprehensive implementation of the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, while also inviting increased cooperation between the treaty organization and United Nations system’s specialized agencies and programmes.
Prior to the vote, Ukraine’s representative said he could not support cooperation between the United Nations and the armed forces of the Russian Federation, which are the core of the treaty organization.  The only right thing that can be done both from a moral and legal perspective is to request a recorded vote on the text, he said, adding that voting in favour of it would mean pressing the trigger of firearms aimed at Ukrainians on the front line.
The representative of the Czech Republic, speaking on behalf of the European Union in its observer capacity, said the bloc can no longer support cooperation between the United Nations and the treaty organization seeing that the Russian Federation’s atrocities reported on a daily basis have indisputably stigmatized the treaty organization and created an unsurmountable obstacle for its cooperation with the United Nations.
The delegate from the Russian Federation, however, said that the completely inappropriate letter from the Ukrainian delegation on the text is regrettable.  The Assembly has on many occasions adopted the draft by consensus; putting a technical draft to a vote will ensure that many similar texts come up for review.
The Assembly also adopted by a recorded vote a draft on cooperation between the United Nations and the Central European Initiative, deciding to retain operative paragraph 3, in which it noted the Initiative’s contribution ‑ through increased political support and concrete assistance to Ukraine and its people ‑ to alleviate the serious consequences caused by the Russian Federation’s aggression against Ukraine.  By other terms, the Assembly acknowledged the Plan of Action 2021–2023 adopted by the Initiative, noting that it was elaborated in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
The representative of Belarus, a treaty organization member, underscored the importance of systematic, consistent dialogue with the organization as a contemporary requirement for the sustainable development of nations and the maintenance of international peace and security.  As member States of the organization favour enhancing cooperation with the United Nations, he voiced his opposition to politicizing traditionally constructive international documents and processes.
Likewise, the speaker for the Russian Federation said regional organizations could play a key role in identifying pathways to resolve conflict, but also expressed regret over the unnecessarily politicized wording of the two paragraphs in that text.
The Assembly further adopted, without a vote, draft resolutions on cooperation between the United Nations and the following organizations:  Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization; Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN); Community of Portuguese-speaking Countries; Organization for Democracy and Economic Development ‑ GUAM; Commonwealth of Independent States; League of Arab States; Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC); International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL); and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).
In other matters, the Assembly decided to reappoint Dorothy Bradley as a member of the Independent Audit Advisory Committee for a three‑year term of office beginning on 1 January 2023.
Also delivering statements today were representatives of Panama, Cambodia (on behalf of ASEAN), Armenia (on behalf of the Collective Security Treaty Organization), Angola, Republic of Moldova, Kazakhstan, Pakistan (on behalf of the OIC), Bulgaria, Bahrain (on behalf of the Arab States), Canada, Slovakia, Bolivia, Argentina, Kuwait, Singapore, Poland, El Salvador, Croatia, United Arab Emirates, Cuba, Thailand, Iran, Czech Republic, Syria, China, Iran, United Kingdom, Belarus, Nicaragua, Pakistan, the United States and Australia.
Observers for the League of Arab States and the INTERPOL also spoke.
Representatives of Türkiye and Cyprus spoke in exercise of the right of reply.
The Assembly will reconvene at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, 30 November, to consider the Question of Palestine, as well as the Situation in the Middle East.
Cooperation between United Nations and Regional Organizations
MARKOVA CONCEPCIÓN JARAMILLO (Panama) introduced the draft resolution “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization” (document A/77/L.4).  Noting that Panama is the Preparatory Commission’s current Chair, she said that the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has established a powerful and global norm against nuclear explosions.  She called on Member States to refrain from any action which could thwart its objective or weaken it.  Adopting the draft text is an opportunity to renew the universality of the Treaty.  The disarmament agenda of the Secretary-General notes that States whose ratifications are necessary for the Treaty to enter into force have a special responsibility in leading the way.  She further urged Member States to adopt “L.4” by consensus.
SOVANN KE (Cambodia), speaking on behalf of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), introduced draft resolution L.12/Rev.1, entitled “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations”.  He stated that this year marked the fifty-fifth anniversary of the establishment of the regional organization, which has transformed the area from a poor to a fast-growing economy.  Since the United Nations became a dialogue partner of the Association in 2011, significant progress has been made in many areas of cooperation, ranging from peacekeeping to development as well as sociocultural and other cross-sectoral fields.  The draft resolution before the Assembly today, he said, seeks to enhance implementation of the Plan of Action on the Joint Declaration on Comprehensive Partnership between ASEAN and the UN (2021‑2025).  Through several rounds of consultations, constructive inputs and comments made by Member States have been incorporated into the draft, which was agreed on by consensus.
DAVIT KNYAZYAN (Armenia), on behalf of States members of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Russian Federation and Tajikistan), introducing the draft resolution titled “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Collective Security Treaty Organization” (document A/77/L.13), said strengthening cooperation between the United Nations and regional and sub-regional organizations is key in addressing challenges to security and maintenance of international and regional peace and security.  The draft builds on efforts by States members of the Treaty Organization in attaining aims and objectives consistent with purposes and principles of the United Nations Charter and international law.  The draft resolution calls for increased collaboration and coordination among specialized agencies and programmes of the United Nations system and the Treaty Organization and encourages the development of direct contacts in areas of mutual interest.  The text represents a technical update of the General Assembly Resolution 75/276, which was adopted without a vote on 28 April 2021.
MARIA DE JESUS DOS REIS FERREIRA (Angola) speaking on behalf of the Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries, presented the draft resolution titled “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries” (document A/77/L.14).  She stated that the Community is a space united by common use of the Portuguese language, made up of more than 300 million people on four continents.  She further explained that the draft highlights the relevance of the Portuguese language in international affairs, and notes the political commitment of the Community to promote its usage in international and regional organizations.  The draft illustrates work carried out by the Community and highlights adoption of its New Vision (2016‑2026).  The text also stresses the importance of partnership and cooperation between the United Nations and other relevant organizations, including the Community of Portuguese Speaking Countries, to improve coordination and cooperation in peacebuilding and peacekeeping.  She made an oral revision to operative paragraph 14, as follows:  “Recalls the resolution 73/339 and acknowledges the important role played by the United Nations Peacebuilding Commission, and its various configurations.”
GHEORGHE LEUCĂ (Republic of Moldova), introducing the draft resolution “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization for Democracy and Economic Development — GUAM” (document A/77/L.15), said the overall goal of the draft is to help promote the vision and principles set out in the United Nations Charter.  The draft emphasizes the importance of strengthening dialogue, cooperation and coordination between the United Nations system and the Organization for Democracy and Economic Development.  It also invites specialized agencies, components, organizations, programmes and funds of the United Nations to cooperate and develop direct contacts with the Organization for Democracy and Economic Development for joint implementation of projects aimed at the attainment of common objectives.  He further expressed hope that the draft would be adopted without a vote, as has been the case in past years.
AKAN RAKHMETULLIN (Kazakhstan), speaking on behalf of the Commonwealth of Independent States, introduced the draft resolution titled “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Commonwealth of Independent States” (document A/77/L.16).  In March of 1994, the General Assembly granted the Commonwealth observer status, he stated, announcing that today the Commonwealth is a reliable partner of the United Nations.  The Commonwealth continues to serve as an important platform in the areas of trade, investment, transport, tourism and education and promotes cultural and humanitarian exchanges as well as sustainable development.  The draft is a technical update of a biennial resolution, based on previous Assembly resolutions, which reaffirms the importance of international cooperation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural or humanitarian character.  Welcoming the commitment of the Commonwealth to intensify and deepen its cooperation with the agencies, programmes and funds of the United Nations system, the text invites these specialized agencies and other organizations, programmes and funds as well as international financial institutions to develop cooperation with the Commonwealth.
MUNIR AKRAM (Pakistan), speaking on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation), introducing the draft resolution on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC)” (document A/77/L.18), said the draft is consistent with the spirit of the resolution which, in 1965, invited the Islamic Organization to participate in the work of the United Nations and its subsidiary organs as an observer.  This year’s resolution contains technical changes, and invites all Member States to observe the International Day to Combat Islamophobia in an appropriate manner.  The draft highlights the desire of the two organizations to work together on shared concerns, including global security, self-determination, respect for territorial integrity, decolonization and combating terrorism.  It covers efforts to combat Islamophobia between the two organizations.  In its operative paragraphs, it recognizes the continuing cooperation between the Islamic Organization and United Nations entities, including the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN‑Women).  Cooperation between the two has never been more important than in these challenging times. It also contains text on how to reinforce cooperation.  Addressing complex challenges together brings countries and international organizations together, and all countries should support the text, adopting it by consensus, he said.
LACHEZARA STOEVA (Bulgaria) introduced the draft resolution “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Central European Initiative” (document A/77/L.19), said the Initiative is firmly committed to further strengthening this partnership and highlighted its continued efforts to contribute to the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  The relationship between the United Nations and regional organizations has assumed even greater importance in the context of the COVID‑19 pandemic, which has demonstrated the need for a unified response from all regions.  Further, she recalled that, since the very beginning of the aggression against Ukraine, the Central European Initiative’s Member States have stood together with that country and supported its sovereignty, independence, unity and territorial integrity.  She expressed the group’s strongest disagreement with the use of force against the territorial integrity of any State.
JAMAL FARES ALROWAIEI (Bahrain), speaking on behalf of the Arab States, introducing the draft resolution titled “Preparation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States” (document A/77/L.17), said the text reaffirms the principles of the United Nations Charter, particularly of cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations, especially international peace and security.  The draft also reflects ongoing cooperation between the League of Arab States and the United Nations and all of its subsidiary bodies.  He further added that the text reflected this strengthened cooperation between the secretariats of the two organizations at both the institutional and staff level.
“Regional organizations, such as the League of Arab States, play a vital role in the world of today,” he emphasized.  The reopening of the liaison office in Cairo for the League of Arab States in March 2022, and the appointment of a high-ranking representative to lead it, contributes to strengthening this cooperation.  He further stated that the two organizations are working hard to expand cooperation, which has been in place for more than half a century.  “We are working together in order to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as our common agenda,” he added.
Ms. POLOZ (Canada), introducing the draft resolution titled “Cooperation between the United Nations and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)” (document A/77/L.20), said the history of this resolution goes back to the beginning of the United Nations and the General Assembly, and has always been adopted by consensus.  Each time it is considered, it reflects the evolving relationship between the Organization and INTERPOL.  This further strengthens cooperation between the two organizations and is supported by Member States who are also members of INTERPOL and the community of police forces that serve the world, including those working in peacekeeping contexts.  The draft includes United Nations Police, the United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism and INTERPOL in designing comprehensive policies to guide law enforcement effectively.  It also takes account of United Nations counter-terrorism reports, and notes the work of the Global Counterterrorism Forum as well as other emerging technologies and methods for criminal and terrorist purposes.  It recognizes the potential for strengthening cooperation for combating international financial crime, money-laundering and corruption.  The text also calls on the United Nations and INTERPOL to strengthen gender mainstreaming in all areas of their work.
MICHAL MLYNÁR (Slovakia), introducing the draft entitled “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)” (document A/77/L.21), said that over the past decades, the OECD was invited to participate as an observer first to the Economic and Social Council, then to the General Assembly and eventually established its Permanent Observer office at the United Nations Headquarters to further develop this special partnership.  To further formalize this cooperation, in March 2021, the General Assembly adopted the first-ever resolution on cooperation between these two organizations.  Today, the partnership between the two is very much alive at the country and regional levels, and the cooperation between the OECD and the United Nations system spans across almost every policy area in the economic, environmental and social domains.  Further, he explained that the main purpose of the draft resolution is to highlight the existing partnership between the United Nations and the OECD and its potential to address the challenges of the 21st century.  The draft welcomes the strengthening of cooperation between the two organizations to accelerate the pace of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, he said.
DIEGO PARY RODRÍGUEZ (Bolivia), tabling the draft resolution on “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Latin American and Caribbean Economic System” (document A/77/L.22), said partnership promotes common strategies between countries and organizations.  Cooperation between the United Nations and the Latin American and Caribbean Economic System has been dynamic and successful in a myriad of different areas, including food, disaster risk reduction and tourism.  He underscored the partnership’s intentions to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  He expressed hope that the resolution would be adopted by consensus.
Statements
MARÍA DEL CARMEN SQUEFF (Argentina) spoke on the draft text titled “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization” (document A/77/L.4).  In a challenging global context, and with exponential technological growth, the quest for sustainable solutions to the challenges of the twenty-first century is a complex task, she said.  This situation highlights the importance of existing cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization.  As a member of the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission, Argentina offers support to the synergy that the organizations have achieved in strengthening the essential role of multilateralism in promoting international peace and security.
ABDULAZIZ A. M. A. ALAJMI (Kuwait), said changes and challenges facing the world make cooperation inevitable, including in light of the increased number of internal and regional organizations.  Addressing all the challenges, including humanitarian and environmental, means enhancing cooperation with the United Nations, he said.  Cooperation should be promoted and furthered to ensure peace, security and stability in the Arab and Islamic regions, with the ultimate goal of ensuring peace in these regions.  Cooperation among Arab States, in the context of the League of Arab States and the Organization for Islamic Cooperation, has increased and become enhanced over previous years.  The General Assembly’s adoption of a resolution to establish an International Day to Combat Islamophobia shows the common objectives of these organizations and the United Nations.
JOHN CHEO (Singapore) said close and effective cooperation between the United Nations, regional and other organizations is indispensable to building the networked multilateral system envisioned in Our Common Agenda.  The continued excellent cooperation between the United Nations and ASEAN is a positive step, he added.  Draft resolution A/77/L.12, which outlines the many areas of partnership between both organizations, including in disaster risk reduction and management, digital economy and cybersecurity, as well as sustainable development, reaffirms the shared commitment for both organizations to do more together under the ambit of the Plan of Action to Implement the Joint Declaration on Comprehensive Partnership between ASEAN and the United Nations (2021‑2025).
JOANNA SYLWIA SKOCZEK (Poland) strongly supported increased cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations, lauding their contributions to international security, upholding human rights and sustainable development.  She underscored the need to employ multilateral solutions in the face of contemporary challenges.  The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe’s comprehensive security concept is essential in addressing todays’ complex challenges with a holistic approach to peace and security.  She welcomed the Secretary General’s Our Common Agenda, the call to convene a meeting between the United Nations and heads of regional organizations in 2023, and more effective cooperation with civil society, the media, private sector, human rights defenders, academia and local governments.  On the text regarding the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (document A/77/L.15), she expressed appreciation for its work on global development.  She also stressed the immediate relevance of the text on the Central European Initiative (document A/77/L.19), urging the Russian Federation to cease its hostilities against Ukraine.
CARLOS EFRAÍN SEGURA ARAGÓN (El Salvador), as a member of INTERPOL for more than six decades, and as the headquarters of one of its six regional bureaus, recognized its work in promoting international police cooperation to make the world a safer place.  He stated the important cooperation between the United Nations and INTERPOL in assisting Member States in their responses to transnational organized crime, the fight against terrorism and its emerging trends and cybercrime, as well as in the continued building and enhancement of their law enforcement capabilities.  The draft resolution strengthens and expands the joint efforts of both organizations, with special emphasis on preventing and combating transnational organized crime, including the illicit manufacture and trafficking of small arms and light weapons, as well as ammunition.  He encouraged stronger cooperation between the United Nations and INTERPOL to support Member States in significantly reducing transnational flows of illicit arms and ammunition trafficking.  Police institutions should aspire to reflect the populations they serve, for which it is necessary to increase the representation of women at all levels, he emphasized, highlighting that a condition for meeting the specific security needs of the population as a whole, applying gender mainstreaming, was necessary.
Ms. ZUBCEVIC (Croatia) stated her disappointment that preambular paragraphs 4 and 6 and operative paragraph 3 of the draft resolution would be voted on for the first time since the Central European Initiative received observer status in December 2011.  “We cannot remain silent when one of our members is under attack,” she insisted, referring to the war in Ukraine.  The Initiative upholds the same values as the United Nations; promotes cooperation, research and work in the area of sustainable development and good governance; as well as addresses transnational threats, and stands for multilateralism and solidarity, she added.
SAEED MOHAMMED SAEED ALHAM ALDHAHERI, (United Arab Emirates), addressing the draft on Cooperation between the United Nations and INTERPOL, said INTERPOL plays an important role in communication and cooperation between police forces, and is the only international organization tasked with application of the law in police activities.  It plays a particularly important role in the fight against threats related to terrorist and criminal groups, he noted, adding that the international community should step up cooperation in fighting against the spread of technologies and weapons that fall into the hands of these groups, including the use of drones.  Moreover, global cooperation is needed between institutions to strengthen maritime security to fight piracy and crimes related to fishing.  It is also necessary to strengthen cooperation between the United Nations and INTERPOL in holding common activities to improve cooperation and capacity-building, he said.
DMITRY A. POLYANSKIY, (Russian Federation) said regional organizations should complement the work of the United Nations and play a key role in identifying pathways to resolve conflict.  The completely inappropriate letter from the Ukrainian delegation on resolution “L.13” is regrettable, he stressed, stating that it is an attempt to project difficult bilateral relations.  The General Assembly has on many occasions adopted the draft by consensus; putting a technical draft to a vote will ensure that many similar texts come up for review.  He further emphasized the importance of supporting the draft on cooperation between the United Nations and the Collective Security Treaty Organization.  Another draft resolution, “L.19”, is also up for a vote, he said, noting that several paragraphs have unnecessarily politicized wording.  Observing that preambular paragraph 6 and operative paragraph 3 contain politicized language, he said the Russian Federation must call for votes on them.
PEDRO LUIS PEDROSO CUESTA (Cuba) expressed support to the draft text “Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization” also known as “L.4”.  He called on the international community to consider the concerns of developing countries in this regard, and help Cuba overcome the obstacles imposed by the economic blockade imposed on Cuba by the United States.  He reiterated Cuba’s historic position in favour of nuclear disarmament and outlined the various steps his country has taken to demonstrate its commitment in this regard.  The only effective way of eradicating the terrible impact of nuclear weapons is their total elimination.  And to achieve that, there must be a comprehensive ban of all nuclear testing as well as the dismantling of such activities, he added.
SURIYA CHINDAWONGSE (Thailand) expressed his support for the partnerships between regional organizations and multilateral institutions.  The concerns, experiences and wisdom of the region matter.  And the global perspective can be very helpful, insightful and supportive, he said.  That is why cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations is so vital and beneficial.  He underscored the important contribution of dialogue and cooperation among Member States and the United Nations system.  The global community is far stronger with close partnerships between the United Nations and regional organizations.
NASRIA ELARDJ FLITTI, observer for the League of Arab States and associating with the Arab Group, called on States to work together in multilateral frameworks with rationalism and wisdom to face today’s almost insurmountable challenges.  The League has worked with the United Nations based on complementarity of peace and security issues for over 70 years.  She welcomed the Liaison Office in Cairo and the appointment of a United Nations representative to strengthen cooperation between the Secretariats of both organizations as well as the series of meetings hosted by the Secretary-General.  International cooperation between regional organizations is especially important in solving the Israeli-Arab conflict, caused by Israel’s occupation of Palestine and the Syrian Arab Golan Heights, she said.  She called for a return to international parameters, pre‑1967 borders and a two‑State solution, with an independent Palestine and Jerusalem as its capital.
Further, cooperation on socioeconomic matters, such as education, female empowerment, electoral processes, youth issues, unemployment and epidemiology is vital to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, she said.  On disarmament, the League calls for a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the Middle East, putting Israel’s nuclear facilities under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guarantees, and an end to interference in the internal affairs of Arab countries.  Moreover, to further cooperation with the United Nations, the League’s capacities must be strengthened, and partnerships set up to better understand reasons behind the region’s instability, she said.  Finally, she spotlighted the Arab world’s commitment to the fight against climate change and its consequences, such as food and water shortages as well as regional and national insecurity.  She called on Member States to adopt the draft on cooperation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States, or “L.17”, without a vote.
PAYMAN GHADIRKHOMI, (Iran), said that while the Secretary General’s note on cooperation between the United Nations and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons had been issued for today’s meeting, the OPCW report it references has not been adopted and the biennial resolution on cooperation between the two organizations has not been tabled and discussed.  This makes it contestable as to what action will be taken.  Iran expects that the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs will adequately address this concern, and that this trend will not happen again in the future, he said, stressing that if it does, it will cast any United Nations operations into doubt.
ODD REIDAR HUMLEGÅRD, International Criminal Police Organization, said that as criminal groups and terrorist networks seek to exploit vulnerabilities, multilateral efforts such as the one displayed in the Assembly today remain vital to maintaining peace, upholding the rule of law and safeguarding the international community’s future.  Draft resolution “L.20” has been updated to reflect the critical areas of ongoing cooperation between the United Nations and INTERPOL, including terrorism, maritime crime, financial crime and corruption, biological incidents, as well as the threats posed by new and emerging technologies, he said.  This third review of that cooperation also expands on the existing language related to collaboration with various United Nations entities and specialized agencies, such as the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the United Nations Office of Counter‑Terrorism, adding references to the essential work being carried out by the United Nations Police, the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).  Resolution “L.20” adopted today marks a new milestone in the common journey towards a safer and more sustainable tomorrow.
The representative of the Czech Republic, speaking on behalf of the European Union on the draft text, “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Collective Security Treaty Organization” (document A/77/L.13), said that cooperation between the United Nations and regional and other organizations can serve as an important tool for effective settlement of conflicts and promotion of peace and security.  The Russian Federation’s aggression against Ukraine, with the support of Belarus, is a clear violation of the United Nations Charter and principles of international law, as confirmed in several resolutions of the General Assembly.
All atrocities reported on a daily basis have indisputably stigmatized the Collective Security Treaty Organization, hampered its credibility and created an unsurmountable obstacle for its cooperation with the United Nations, he said.  Against this background, the European Union can no longer support cooperation between the United Nations and the Collective Security Treaty Organization.  He invited all United Nations Member States to consider taking the same approach in this regard.
The representative of Ukraine commented on the draft “L.13”, stating that cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations has been an important tool for the effective settlement of conflicts, the promotion of peace and security, humanitarian assistance, development and the protection of human rights.  “One could hardly doubt the need to further enhance the cooperation with regional organizations, whose members are guided by the United Nations Charter and do not violate its core principles”, he said.  The General Assembly adopted on 2 March, by an overwhelming majority, the resolution on aggression against Ukraine conducted by armed forces of the Russian Federation, with the full assistance and support of Belarus, both members of the Collective Security Treaty Organization.  The only right thing that can be done both from a moral and legal perspective is to request a recorded vote on this draft resolution.  Ukraine cannot support cooperation between the United Nations and the armed forces of the Russian Federation, which are the core of the Treaty Organization.  Voting in favour of this draft resolution will mean pressing the trigger of firearms aimed at Ukrainians on the front line.
GHEORGHE LEUCĂ, (Moldova), on draft resolution “L.16”, said cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations could help protect and promote the principles of the United Nations Charter.  Activities outlined in the Secretary-General’s report on cooperation between the United Nations and the Commonwealth of Independent States (document A/77/277), due to reservations on regulation of the Chairperson of the Commonwealth, Moldova does not recognize its international legal personality.  The Commonwealth’s basic documents, namely the agreement on its establishment, the Alma‑Ata Declaration do not contain features making it subject to international law.  The adoption of the resolution should not invalidate Moldova’s previous stance on similar resolutions, he said.
MARAH MUSTAFA (Syria) said there is no need to present the report on the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and the Chemical Weapons Convention to the General Assembly since discussions on “L.25” are still ongoing in the Hague.  She then noted that she will also make comments during the Conference of the States Parties in the Hague.
Action
By a recorded vote, the Assembly decided to adopt “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Collective Security Treaty Organization” (document A/77/L.13) with 51 in favour and 7 against (Guatemala, Liberia, Lithuania, Marshall Islands, North Macedonia, Poland, Ukraine), with 70 abstentions.
Turning to “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Central European Initiative” (document A/77/L.19), the Assembly decided to retain Preambular Paragraph 6 and Operative Paragraph 3 in a recorded vote of 78 in favour and 7 against (Belarus, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Eritrea, Nicaragua, Russian Federation, Syria), with 40 abstentions.
The Assembly then voted to adopt “L.19” as a whole in a recorded vote of 102 in favour and five against (Belarus, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Nicaragua, Russian Federation, Syria), with 28 abstentions.
The Assembly also adopted the following draft resolutions without a vote:  “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization” (document A/77/L.4); “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations” (document A/77/L.12/Rev.1); “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Community of Portuguese-speaking Countries” (document A/77/L.14); Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization for Democracy and Economic Development ‑ GUAM” (document A/77/L.15); “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Commonwealth of Independent States” (document A/77/L.16); “Cooperation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States” (document A/77/L.17); “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation” (document A/77/L.18); “Cooperation between the United Nations and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)” (document A/77/L.20), and “Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization for Economic Co‑operation and Development (OECD)” (document A/77/L.21).
The representative of the Czech Republic, speaking on behalf of the European Union and commenting on “L.18”, expressed his disappointment that despite strong objections from several delegations, reference to the Organization of Islamic Cooperation 2025 Programme of Action has been maintained.  The Programme related to Cyprus is not consistent with existing Security Council and General Assembly resolutions regarding the sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity of Cyprus.  He disassociated himself from consensus on this preambular paragraph and reiterated his call to the Islamic Organization to refrain from adopting positions that will undermine international law and the United Nations Charter.
On “L.20”, he noted that the text continues to acknowledge the existing institutional relationship between the United Nations and INTERPOL, while strengthening this cooperation within respective mandates of both organizations, and raising awareness among Member States about their roles.  He explained that this year’s draft reflects evolving cooperation between them and shared the view that it would positively contribute to further development and deepening of this relationship.  However, there were a couple of important areas where the final language does not fully reflect positive developments.  In particular, he hoped for a more ambitious provision regarding compliance with human rights as well as the mainstreaming of a gender perspective and advancing gender equality in law enforcement.  Nonetheless, he was able to join the consensus.
The representative of China said she supported enhanced cooperation between regional organizations and the United Nations.  She found it regrettable that, during consultations for the resolution on cooperation with the United Nations and the Central European Initiative, or “L.19”, some countries’ concerns were not addressed.  Certain paragraphs do not reflect consensus and, as such, China abstained.  The crisis in Ukraine and its spill-over effects have caused widespread repercussions for the work of the United Nations on all levels, she said.  China has always stood for sovereignty, territorial integrity and the peaceful resolution of that crisis, she added, calling for diplomatic negotiations and a sustainable European security architecture that accommodates all legitimate security concerns.
The representative of Iran said that his delegation voted in favour of “L.19” to preserve its long-standing support for this resolution, but disassociates itself from six preambular paragraphs and operative paragraph 3.  Non-consensual language is reflected in the final draft, as the drafters did not consider all points of view.
The representative of the United Kingdom, noting that the Collective Security Treaty Organization includes Belarus and the Russian Federation, said her country could not support a resolution welcoming that organization against the backdrop of the Russian Federation’s illegal aggression against Ukraine.  The United Kingdom, she stressed, remains committed to working with other members.
The representative of Belarus, speaking as a member of the Collective Security Treaty Organization, underscored the importance of systematic and consistent dialogue with that organization as a contemporary requirement for the sustainable development of nations and the maintenance of international peace and security.  As member States of that organization are in favour of enhancing cooperation with the United Nations, he voiced his opposition against politicizing traditionally constructive international documents and processes.  Responding to unfounded allegations against his country, he reiterated that Belarus has not taken, is not taking and does not intend to take part in the Russian Federation’s special military operation against Ukraine.
The representative of Nicaragua expressed regret over the politicization of “L.19”.  The text should have been adopted by consensus, reflecting initiatives in the region and improving cooperation with the United Nations.  Nicaragua, she reiterated, defends the principle of not supporting country-specific resolutions, which politicize the Organization’s work and dilute the purpose of any resolution.  Voicing her additional regret that concerns of many delegations were not considered during consultations, she said her country voted against the resolution.  The text lacks balance, as it does not mention restrictions on the Russian Federation.  Preambular paragraph 6 and operative paragraph 3 should have been eliminated, she added.  In the future, facilitators should work on a consensus text with concrete, positive language, including activities within the framework of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
The representative of Ukraine, dissociating himself from the consensus on “L.16”, recalled the decision of his Parliament in 1991, which specified that Ukraine, as a founding member, denied the Commonwealth of Independent States the status of a subject of international law.  The adoption of the draft, he stressed, does not restore the Commonwealth such a status.  While his country recognizes the importance of United Nations’ cooperation with regional organizations in the settlement of conflicts and promotion of peace and security, he said he could not support the idea of using the Organization to promote the Commonwealth of Independent States.  It is clear that the Commonwealth, led by the Russian Federation, will not lead to a peaceful settlement of the aggression against Ukraine; rather, it has encouraged its Member States to further violate international law, he pointed out.
The representative of Pakistan, in explanation of vote after the vote, said she voted “yes” on draft “L.19” regarding cooperation between the United Nations and the Central European Initiative, as she supported the broader goal of the resolution.  However, she abstained on preambular paragraph 6 and operative paragraph 3 of the draft resolution.
The representative of Syria said that the process surrounding a United Nations resolution should be transparent, in good faith and underpinned by a desire for consensus and unity.  Contentious language should be avoided at all costs to maintain the spirit of cooperation and multilateralism, on which the Organization is supposed to stand.  The text “L.19,” on Cooperation between the United Nations and the Central European Initiative, aims to strengthen multilateralism, prompt solidarity, and build a united, cohesive, stable Europe without division.  However, the text is full of politized and hostile language, undermining the spirit of cooperation and bringing divergence.  Many delegations’ concerns were not taken into consideration.  He said that targeting one country is not the solution to any problem, spotlighting his own country’s experience with a country-specific resolution against it for the last 10 years.  This text is not a step forward, but, indeed, a step backward, which is why Syria voted against “L.19”.
The representative of United States of America addressing the resolution on Cooperation Between the United Nations and the Commonwealth of Independent States, said it does not refer to cooperation between the United Nations and the Commonwealth in the area of human rights.  Measures to counter terrorism and violent extremism must respect international law obligations and not be used as a pretext to limit the exercise of human rights and fundamental freedoms, including freedom of expression, by political opponents or civil society members.  Speech that promotes an ideology or belief alone even “extremism” is generally protected by freedom of expression; violent extremism should be the focus of United Nations Member States’ efforts.  All Commonwealth members should invite relevant special procedures mandate holders for country visits and cooperate with them on their recommendations.  The Russian Federation should grant the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Russian Federation, once appointed, access to the country.
The representative of Australia, in explanation of vote after the vote for draft resolution “L.18” on cooperation between the United Nations and the OIC, supported the cooperation between the two organizations and the text.  He was, however, disappointed that the draft resolution referenced the OIC’s 2025 Programme of Action, which unfairly singled out Israel.  For this reason, he disassociated himself from the consensus on the preambular paragraphs that referenced the Programme of Action.
The representative of Canada said he strongly supports the objectives of resolution “L.18”, on cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation.  However, he dissociated from preambular paragraph 4 on the 2025 Programme of Action, as it singles out Israel and does not bring parties closer to a two-State solution
Right of Reply
The representative of Türkiye, speaking in exercise of the right of reply, said the European Union’s statements reflect bias or prejudice.  Since the European Union’s admittance of the Greek-Cypriot administration as a full member of the bloc, despite the overwhelming vote in 2004 against a comprehensive settlement, it has been unable to adopt a balanced position on the issue.  As long as its position exclusively reflects the interests of Greek-Cypriots, the European Union will continue to disqualify itself as an objective contributor to a solution, he warned.  Urging all to focus on realities, he called on the international community to reaffirm the sovereign equality and equal international status of the Turkish-Cypriot people and act accordingly.
The representative of Cyprus speaking in exercise of the right to reply, said the Turkish delegation must respect the names of its fellow States.  A few days ago, the representative of Türkiye stated that “we must collectively ensure that the founding principles of the United Nations Charter are upheld:  these are the only ways to save ourselves from the scourge of war”.  The principles of the United Nations Charter, as the Secretary-General has said, are not an a la carte menu‑they must be applied as a whole.  The statement just heard exposes once again Türkiye’s agenda of division, using the Turkish Cypriot community as a pretext.  Türkiye’s aggressive rhetoric shows once again who is responsible for the situation in Cyprus.  Türkiye must abandon the two‑State solution and resume negotiations on the basis of successive Security Council resolutions, while engaging constructively in finding a fair solution to the problem of Cyprus that will genuinely reunite the country.
Independent Audit Advisory Committee
Turning its attention to the five-member Independent Audit Advisory Committee, the Assembly decided not to discuss the report of the Committee (document A/77/571/Add.1).  The Assembly then reappointed Dorothy Bradley (Belize), without a vote, as a member of that Committee for a three-year term of office beginning on 1 January 2023.

In Côte d’Ivoire, the United Nations continues to support authorities to improve the well-being and livelihoods of communities in the country’s northern region. Since the end of May, Côte d’Ivoire has registered around 4,000 refugees fleeing from neighbouring Burkina Faso, including 2,200 children.
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